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LECTURES

In “Days of Oris 2016” in Zagreb with William Curtis, Patrik Schumacher and Pezo von Ellrichshausen

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07/13/2016

We invite you to join us at the 16th Days of Oris in Zagreb, which will be held 15 to 16 October 2016 in the Lisinski Concert Hall.

Days of Oris are international architectural symposium organized by Oris House of Architecture, created after the initial success of Oris magazine that continuously published for the eighteenth year as a bimonthly, and in September this year celebrates its 100th edition.

SPEAKERS:

Ana Kucan (Slovenia)
Landscape architect and winner of Piranesi, central prizes …

With neat (Croatia)
Croatian representative at the Venice Biennale, winner of the Zagreb Salon, Piranesi awards …

Numen / For Use (Croatia / Austria)
design collective endless series of top results

Umberto Bonomo (Chile)
The young creator and promoter, the participant is the most propulsive world architectural scene, one of Chile

Pezo von Ellrichshausen (Chile)
Winners of the Mies van der Rohe prize for America

Patrik Schumacher – Zaha Hadid Architects (UK)
Zaha Hadid Architects – partner and director of

Iñaqui Carnicero (Spain)
Winner of the Golden Lion this year’s Venice Biennale

William JR Curtis (United Kingdom)
One of the most important architectural critics today. The undisputed connoisseur LeCorbusierovog work!

Bernard Khoury (Lebanon)
One of the founders of the Arab cultural center. He was a representative of the Kingdom of Bahrain at the Venice Biennale in 2014, and his work has been exhibited in many academic institutions in Europe and the United States.

Ticket price: 450 HRK
price student tickets: 250 HRK

Days of Oris 16 are included in the program of professional training of the Croatian Chamber of Architects with 18 hours.

INFORMATION AND TICKET SALES

Contact person /// May Demšar Brankovic
Oris doo
King Držislava 3, HR-10000 Croatia, Zagreb
tel: + 385 1 37 78 177
fax: + 385 1 37 56 243
e-mail: [email protected]
website: www. oris.hr

Days of Oris 15

https://vimeo.com/149152245
http://oris.hr/hr/dani-orisa/prethodni-dani/dani-orisa-15

Lorena del Río and Iñaqui Carnicero will be teaching Studios at California College of the Arts in San Francisco

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Monday, September 19, 7:00 pm
Iñaqui Carnicero & Lorena del Rio
Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus

Free and open to the public
More info: Amanda Schwerin,[email protected]

Lorena del Rio and Iñaqui Carnicero (RICA* Studio / CCA faculty), based in Madrid, are newly appointed CCA Architecture faculty.

RICA* is a young architectural office and a platform for design investigation operating across many scales. Based in Madrid and New York, RICA* represents a new phase for del Río and Carnicero who together bring an extensive and diverse building experience.

Lorena del Río and Iñaqui Carnicero inaugurating the lecture series at CCA (California College of the Arts)

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Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus

Free and open to the public
More info: Amanda Schwerin,[email protected]

Lorena del Rio and Iñaqui Carnicero (RICA* Studio / CCA faculty), based in Madrid, are newly appointed CCA Architecture faculty.

RICA* is a young architectural office and a platform for design investigation operating across many scales. Based in Madrid and New York, RICA* represents a new phase for del Río and Carnicero who together bring an extensive and diverse building experience.

LORENA DEL RIO

In her research, Lorena del Rio concentrates on the use of plastic in architecture — from the early days of its development up to today — and investigates new concepts related to the specific qualities of plastic materials in design.

Since 2008 she has worked with Selgascano, participating in the development process of multiple projects including Cartagena Auditorium, Plasencia Convention Center, and Merida Young Factory.

These projects include the use of plastics in a variety of innovative ways. She has also collaborated with Iñaqui Carnicero, her partner, in various competitions and has earned awards and been published internationally.

Through a scholarship granted by the Spanish Ministry of Education, she worked with the Department of Architectural Design and Urban Planning during her studies in 2005–6.

Del Rio earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture from the Polytechnic University of Madrid in 2008. She completed her PhD courses in 2010.

IÑAQUI CARNICERO

Active in both the academic field and with a professional practice, Carnicero is an internationally awarded architect, European PhD, and academic with experience at the Polytechnic University of Madrid and Cornell University.

He was recently awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2016 as director of the Spanish Pavilion with the exhibition Unfinished.

Carnicero has won several competitions and completed many projects including C.E.U. University, Social Housing in Vallecas, a high school in Albacete, the restoration of an Arab tower in Guadalajara, the new District Attorney’s Office in Madrid’s City of Justice, Hangar 16 Matadero-Madrid at the former slaughterhouse of Madrid, and the Pitch´s house.

He has been the director of Symmetries, an architecture platform that relates roman and contemporary strategies in the city.

His dissertation focuses on Louis Kahn’s and Robert Venturi’s discoveries and connections with Rome.

Carnicero, with his partner, Lorena del Rio, has run the office Rica Studio since 2012.

Unfinished article in Divisare

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15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

Unfinished
Curated by Iñaqui Carnicero and Carlos Quintáns. Project winner of the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. For a concisely curated selection of emerging architects whose work shows how creativity and commitment can transcend material constraints.

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

Spain is one of the countries where the practice of architecture has been most affected by the economic crisis. There are few places on earth where such large numbers of buildings were built in such a short period of time. The lack of reflection over whether these projects were necessary or valid resulted in the subsequent abandonment of many buildings when their completion or maintenance was discovered not to be economically viable. Their appearance throughout Spanish territories has generated a collection of unfinished buildings where the factor of time was eliminated from the formula for making architecture.
Using photography as a filter to portray this reality, the Pavilion’s central space represents the optimistic view of those who have fought back against this recent past,understanding these inherited constructions as an opportunity.

RICA* STUDIO

The ¨Unfinished¨ exhibition, presented in the Spanish pavilion at the Biennale, seeks to direct attention to processes more than results in an attempt to discover design strategies generated by an optimistic view of the constructed environment. The exhibition gathers examples of architecture produced during the past few years, born out of renunciation and economy of means, designed to evolve and adapt to future necessities and trusting in the beauty conferred by the passage of time. These projects have understood the lessons of the recent past and consider architecture to be something unfinished, in a constant state of evolution and truly in the service of humanity. The current moment of uncertainty in our profession makes its consideration here especially relevant.

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

FERNANDO MAQUIEIRA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

JESÚS GRANADA

15 Biennale di Venezia. Spanish Pavilion

ANDREA AVEZZÙ

Dialogue: Iñaqui Carnicero, co-curator Spanish Pavilion la Biennale di Venezia. Architectem Magazine

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Spanish Pavilion Venice Biennale 2016

The Spanish Pavilion was awarded a Golden Lion at this year’s Venice Biennale, featuring a new type of architecture that emerged in the country after the financial crisis.

Under the title “Unfinished”, the exhibition curated by architects Iñaqui Carnicero and Carlos Quintáns consists of nearly 67 proposals and 7 photographic series presenting answers to the problems arising in Spain after the housing boom post-crisis. The inherited situation has led to many architectural studies to reflect on the passage of time in architecture and to respond against the excesses of the past.

Exhibition curator Iñaqui Carnicero is an Architect and has served as a visiting Professor at Cornell University. He has been recognised with numerous international awards such as the Design Vanguard Award, AIANY Housing Award, Emerging Architects Award, FAD and COAM Award.

Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez
Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez

The exhibit is divided into four areas:

Photographic series – highlighting otherwise hidden situations for visitors to reflect on the outcome of Spain’s construction frenzy and the affect of the financial crisis.

Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez
Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez

Selected Works – Displayed in the side rooms, featuring projects that deal with strategies that architects put into play as a response to these situations. These projects are further catalogued under the titles: Consolidate, Reapropiation, Adaptable, Naked, Perching, Infill, Reassignments, Guides, and Pavements.

Photo: Luis Diaz
Photo: Luis Diaz

Selected entries – Presenting selected projects from an open competition aimed at searching for unpublished projects responding to the proposed theme.

Interviews – Behind the central space and between the side spaces is a continuous projection of interviews, recording comments by renowned architecture personalities on “Unfinished” as well as about Spanish architecture. Speakers include Amale Andraos (Dean at Columbia University), Kenneth Frampton (Full Professor at Columbia University), Sarah Whiting (Dean at Rice University), Andrea Simitch (Associate Professor at Cornell University), Sou Fujimoto (Architect), Barry Bergdol (Ex curator MoMA), Val Warke (Associate Professor at Cornell University), Jorge Silvetti (Full Professor at Harvard GSD), Nader Tehrani (Dean of Cooper Union), Meijeen Yoon (Chair MIT) and Martino Stierli (Chief Curator MoMA )

Interviews
Interviews

ARCHITECTEM met with Iñaqui at the vernissage to discuss the exhibition and the challenges contemporary designers face in Spain – below is a condensed version of the conversation

 

Unfinished seeks to direct attention to processes more than results in an attempt to discover design strategies generated by an optimistic view of the constructed environment. The exhibition gathers examples of architecture produced during the past few years, born out of renunciation and economy of means, designed to evolve and adapt to future necessities and trusting in the beauty conferred by the passage of time. These projects have understood the lessons of the recent past and consider architecture to be something unfinished, in a constant state of evolution and truly in the service of humanity. The current moment of uncertainty in our profession makes its consideration here, especially relevant.

 

Re-Edificatoria_ Adrià Goula ©Adrià Goula
Re-Edificatoria_ Adrià Goula ©Adrià Goula

ARCHITECTEM Let’s begin with the concept

 

IC This year Alejandro Aravena invited curators of all the national pavilions to respond to what we think is the major issue that architecture has been suffering in recent years. For us in Spain, it was very obvious; the problem has to do with the fact that when we benefited from a period of economic wealth, we started building many public and private buildings, without reflecting too much on necessity. After the economic crisis, some of these structures that were under construction remained unfinished, because the clients did not have money and resources to maintain them. What we have in Spain right now is a collection of contemporary buildings, what we call ‘contemporary ruins’, that exist all over and nobody is taking care of. So the idea of the pavilion is on one hand reporting these situations, these unfinished constructions but at the same time giving a positive perspective. By inviting seven photographers in the central space we are showing the work of seven people who have been documenting these ruins and it has a certain beauty of showing things that are meant to be hidden. For us the beauty of the process is the opportunity it leads you to find other tools or strategies that can be used to solve things. On the one hand, we are reporting the situation in the central space, and at the same time we are showing on the sides, solutions.

ARCHITECTEM The catalogue posits “The selected projects show the architects response to the economic and construction crisis over the past years in Spain through virtues that can become strategies or creative speculations which are capable to subvert the past condition into a positive contemporary action.” Do the ‘contemporary ruins’ act as dynamic case studies in the quest for solutions?

IC They became the tool to report this situation. So as solutions to the unfinished projects, the projects on the sides consider the built environment as part of the strategy and reflect on the amount of architecture needed to be produced in order to solve the problem and to activate these abandoned constructions.

Two Houses at Oropesa, Paredes Pedrosa ©Luis Asín
Two Houses at Oropesa, Paredes Pedrosa ©Luis Asín

ARCHITECTEM The strategies thus proposed are specific to the local context; can they be universally applied?

IC I think it can be universally applied, I mean this problem of incomplete and unfinished construction or this idea of reflecting on the factor of time in architecture is relevant for us, its very contemporary for us, but we can find it in other countries, other contexts and I think it’s a critical global issue. It brings attention to the fact that we have to be aware of the resources we have and to balance the amount of resources we put on the table to solve problems. Actually I think it is an opportunity.

ARCHITECTEMBeing an active academic, are these issues of reassignment, adaptability and re-appropriation a focus in the studios you teach?

IC Defiantly. At Cornell these past three years, these have been the major topics we have been working on in the studios as well. I like to always put students under constraints. Certain constraints are often given by the site, by the political situations, and sometimes defined by the history of a place. By reducing the amount of elements students can use, they are forced to improve their creativity.

Depósito del Rei Martí 11_ARCHIKUBIK_©Adrià Goula
Depósito del Rei Martí 11_ARCHIKUBIK_©Adrià Goula

ARCHITECTEM In the prevailing economic and political environment do you anticipate architects bearing increasing responsibility to provide solutions for unfinished and existing projects?

IC In Spain it’s happening, because of the lack of investment for new buildings many offices are inventing this new strategy; adding to or removing from things that already exist, sometimes thinking about the evolution of a building by proposing solutions but then also thinking about what will happen in another 20 years. So this a new way of thinking about design in Spain, that I think could be extended to other countries.

Depósito del Rei Martí 11_ARCHIKUBIK_©Adrià Goula
Depósito del Rei Martí 11_ARCHIKUBIK_©Adrià Goula

ARCHITECTEMWill this global movement affect the way we define star architects or style specific architectural design?

IC Of course, 8 years ago in the model we had, the masters were star architects defining their own brand. They were fighting to restore an old language and then going on to define what they thought was their unique language. Now these proposals are more related to offices, where young architects are less interested in defining their own brand and more in using the tools they learn in school in order to produce and improve living conditions by measuring the amount of new architecture they need to produce. I think the identity of the architect is still there, if you see these 55 projects you can see very different approach. And they identify very different interests. I’m not saying that the architect, the creativity of the architect is not present anymore. It’s an opportunity to be more creative with less tools. I’m very positive about the near future and this shift, I think, is going to improve things.

Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez
Pabellón de España ©Juan Rodríguez

The exhibition at the Venice Biennale will remain open up till 27 November 2016.